Object #1000954 from MS-Papers-0032-0215

3 pages written 31 Oct 1845 by George Clarke in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items). 28 letters written from Auckland and Bay of Islands, 1844-1874. Piece-level inventory in folder (list excludes letters accessioned in 1969)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Private.
Auckland
Oct. 31st. 1845.


Dear McLean,

By your last letter I learn you were just starting for Wanganui by way of Taupo so far as the report of Taraia and his people being on their way with a Taua it is a mere wild goose chase Taraia and the Maketu people are all quiet at their cultivations and it is not very likely that they can make any movements of a formidable nature without our having some knowledge of them I however contemplate much good from

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English (ATL)

your occasional visits among the Natives of the interior and it will be some satisfaction to the settlers to see and know you so willing to prevent alarm or collision. I think that we must consider Wanganui as in the District of the Protector at Wellington and whatever may be done there by you copies of your proceedings should be forwarded to His Honor the Superintendant of the Southern district, but as you will find that settlers and natives fears arise from mere rumour you will not have much to communicate you will find Rev. R. Taylor rather a nervous man and as he knows but little of the language he is apt to make some mistakes and to entertain groundless fears.

Every thing at the North is much as when I last wrote Natives were in the bush and had written asking the Governor to make peace I believe they are heartily tired of the war but too proud to make much of an acknowledgement of it. If driven to extremities they would be a most formidable enemy, and a continued war would be destructive to the Colony as well as ruinous to the Natives. Those and those only who are labouring for peace are the real friends of the Colony.

Mr. Henry I am thankful to say is

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English (ATL)

getting about very nicely. He is able to walk with only a stick and can ride out on horseback. I hope soon to avail myself of his serives in the office. By all means discourage the project of the Natives buying a ship to migrate to some other Islands in the South Sea they will never do so well as they may do here.

You have heard of our good Governor's recall. I have not yet heard who is to be his successor.


Yours very truly,
George Clarke.

English (ATL)

Private.
Auckland
Oct. 31st. 1845.


Dear McLean,

By your last letter I learn you were just starting for Wanganui by way of Taupo so far as the report of Taraia and his people being on their way with a Taua it is a mere wild goose chase Taraia and the Maketu people are all quiet at their cultivations and it is not very likely that they can make any movements of a formidable nature without our having some knowledge of them I however contemplate much good from your occasional visits among the Natives of the interior and it will be some satisfaction to the settlers to see and know you so willing to prevent alarm or collision. I think that we must consider Wanganui as in the District of the Protector at Wellington and whatever may be done there by you copies of your proceedings should be forwarded to His Honor the Superintendant of the Southern district, but as you will find that settlers and natives fears arise from mere rumour you will not have much to communicate you will find Rev. R. Taylor rather a nervous man and as he knows but little of the language he is apt to make some mistakes and to entertain groundless fears.

Every thing at the North is much as when I last wrote Natives were in the bush and had written asking the Governor to make peace I believe they are heartily tired of the war but too proud to make much of an acknowledgement of it. If driven to extremities they would be a most formidable enemy, and a continued war would be destructive to the Colony as well as ruinous to the Natives. Those and those only who are labouring for peace are the real friends of the Colony.

Mr. Henry I am thankful to say is getting about very nicely. He is able to walk with only a stick and can ride out on horseback. I hope soon to avail myself of his serives in the office. By all means discourage the project of the Natives buying a ship to migrate to some other Islands in the South Sea they will never do so well as they may do here.

You have heard of our good Governor's recall. I have not yet heard who is to be his successor.


Yours very truly,
George Clarke.

Part of:
Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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