Object #1000937 from MS-Papers-0032-0228

7 pages written 18 Jul 1853 by George Sisson Cooper in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items). 105 letters written from Taranaki, Hawke's Bay & Wellington. Contains correspondence between McLean and Cooper with regard to the purchase of Maori land in Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa in particular, and various complaints and issues that arose from the purchases; also contains information and discussions about the spread of the Pai Marire and Ringatu religions (again, with a particular focus on Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa), and about general Maori affairs. Includes draft letters from McLean to Cooper; letters from George's wife Ellen C Cooper, 1863-1872, and from Sarah Cooper (undated).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Taranaki
July 18th. 1853


My dear McLean,

The Election terminated on Saturday and C. Brown beat Halse by 35. The numbers were

Brown 173 Halse 138 Wicksteed 12

323 out of 353, leaving 30 non voters.

This was entirely managed by a dodge, and as Halse said on the Hustings we are circumvented, not beaten. Wicksteed, finding before the election that he had

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English (ATL)

no chance, agreed with Brown that he (B.) was to pay all his electioneering expenses and that W. would poll in the early part of the day all those who would have voted for Halse if released from their promises to him; and then he would resign, handing over the balance of his supporters to Brown --- they worked this dodge so well that out of about 50 voters, who had promised to, only two went over to Halse, after W. retired. The result is that we are divided into two distinct parties. Brown is supported by the rabble --- his most respectable men being Curtis and Watt, Dorset, Chilman, Tom King, Richmond Hursthouse --- Halse is supported by all the Magistrates and Clergy, Richardson, Cap. King etc. etc. The determination the true blue party have come to is that now the rabble have made their man Supt. we must put as many of our men into the Council to counteract them as possible, and W. King, Cutfield and others will now stand. Wicksteed has utterly ruined himself. When his bargain with C. B. was made, the first

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English (ATL)

thing he tried to do was to destroy Halse's character and take away the support of the Clergy and all who would follow them, by telling Mr. Govett that it was notorious that Halse constantly had Maori women at his house for himself and his friends, thereby converting the land office into a "common brothel" (these are the words he used). Govett told de Mole and I, saying if it were true he would not support Halse and we went at once to W. and made him sign a paper calling himself a liar. This paper I have and will show you if you ever come here.

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English (ATL)


About land affairs. I pushed the Mangoraka question to the uttermost, but finding that the opposition were very determined and that bloodshed would be the result of an attempt to traverse the boundaries, I put a temporary stop to the affair, and I am disposed to let it rest till Sir G. Grey arrives. I am now urging the Waiwakaiho question as hard as I can, but the jealousy between Po and the puketapu continues still very strong and gives me a deal of anxiety. If I can only get over that

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English (ATL)

all will go well. But Raniers says settle the inland block and then I'll talk about the Hua. Po says you shan't pay for the inland block unless the other is added and on this point they take their stand. Po now says there shall be no boundary this side of Waitaha (i.e. that all from the Bell Block to Waiwakaiho river shall go in one piece) but I am aware that this is nonsense and I only fear that he may so

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English (ATL)

annoy the Puketapus that mischief may result.

The Natives are very angry at C.B.'s election. The only way I could quiet them was by saying that all remained as before as concerned them, Sir G. Grey was still their Govr. and I was his deputy, and that C.B. was only Govr. for the Pakehas. How it will end I can't tell, but I have determined on keeping the Natives quiet as far as possible, especially as it is decided that the

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English (ATL)

Europeans will not petition against C. B.

I am afraid I have writtena rambling letter --- but you will excuse it. I am so full of these things that I can hardly concentrate my ideas on any one subject. It is posthour and I must conclude.

Believe me
Ever faithfully yours
G.S. Cooper

English (ATL)

Taranaki
July 18th. 1853


My dear McLean,

The Election terminated on Saturday and C. Brown beat Halse by 35. The numbers were

Brown 173 Halse 138 Wicksteed 12

323 out of 353, leaving 30 non voters.

This was entirely managed by a dodge, and as Halse said on the Hustings we are circumvented, not beaten. Wicksteed, finding before the election that he had no chance, agreed with Brown that he (B.) was to pay all his electioneering expenses and that W. would poll in the early part of the day all those who would have voted for Halse if released from their promises to him; and then he would resign, handing over the balance of his supporters to Brown --- they worked this dodge so well that out of about 50 voters, who had promised to, only two went over to Halse, after W. retired. The result is that we are divided into two distinct parties. Brown is supported by the rabble --- his most respectable men being Curtis and Watt, Dorset, Chilman, Tom King, Richmond Hursthouse --- Halse is supported by all the Magistrates and Clergy, Richardson, Cap. King etc. etc. The determination the true blue party have come to is that now the rabble have made their man Supt. we must put as many of our men into the Council to counteract them as possible, and W. King, Cutfield and others will now stand. Wicksteed has utterly ruined himself. When his bargain with C. B. was made, the first thing he tried to do was to destroy Halse's character and take away the support of the Clergy and all who would follow them, by telling Mr. Govett that it was notorious that Halse constantly had Maori women at his house for himself and his friends, thereby converting the land office into a "common brothel" (these are the words he used). Govett told de Mole and I, saying if it were true he would not support Halse and we went at once to W. and made him sign a paper calling himself a liar. This paper I have and will show you if you ever come here.

About land affairs. I pushed the Mangoraka question to the uttermost, but finding that the opposition were very determined and that bloodshed would be the result of an attempt to traverse the boundaries, I put a temporary stop to the affair, and I am disposed to let it rest till Sir G. Grey arrives. I am now urging the Waiwakaiho question as hard as I can, but the jealousy between Po and the puketapu continues still very strong and gives me a deal of anxiety. If I can only get over that all will go well. But Raniers says settle the inland block and then I'll talk about the Hua. Po says you shan't pay for the inland block unless the other is added and on this point they take their stand. Po now says there shall be no boundary this side of Waitaha (i.e. that all from the Bell Block to Waiwakaiho river shall go in one piece) but I am aware that this is nonsense and I only fear that he may so annoy the Puketapus that mischief may result.

The Natives are very angry at C.B.'s election. The only way I could quiet them was by saying that all remained as before as concerned them, Sir G. Grey was still their Govr. and I was his deputy, and that C.B. was only Govr. for the Pakehas. How it will end I can't tell, but I have determined on keeping the Natives quiet as far as possible, especially as it is decided that the Europeans will not petition against C. B.

I am afraid I have writtena rambling letter --- but you will excuse it. I am so full of these things that I can hardly concentrate my ideas on any one subject. It is posthour and I must conclude.

Believe me
Ever faithfully yours
G.S. Cooper

Part of:
Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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