Object #1000898 from MS-Papers-0032-0001

6 pages written by Sir Donald McLean

From: Protector of Aborigines - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0001 (21 digitised items). Memos and correspondence with George Clarke, the Chief Protector of Aborigines, including draft reports by McLean on his meetings with Maori relating to disputes and negotiations over land.Also includes translation of a letter (1844) from Te Wherowhero to the Taranaki chiefs urging them not to follow Te Rauparaha's example of confrontation refering to the Wairau conflict (1839) and notes of a meeting between Ngamotu Maori and McLean, 27 Sep 1844.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


Land Question.

Meeting of the Ngamotu Natives with Mr. McLean, on Friday 27th. September 1844.

Poharama,-

"We have come to talk to you about our lands.

D. McLean,-

"I am always anxious to hear what you have to say about your lands; and prepared to hear any statements you have to make relative thereto."

Poharama,-

"From Mungootuku to Waiwakaio, we are willing to let the Europeans have, to extend inland to the line cut by the surveyors known as Holdsworthy's line. Let the sea side of this line be for the Europeans, and inland for the natives. I am willing to divide ourselves into distinct tribes, if you wish it; but our lands we cannot divide; as it is joint property. And we all consent that the portion we mention be given to the Europeans. If we divide our lands it will cause disputes among ourselves."

D. McLean,-

"The Governor wishes me to find out the distinct portions belonging to each individual or tribe; and as I suppose that the inland part of this surveyed block is only claimed by a few natives, perhaps you will point out your distinct claims inland."

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English (ATL)


Poharama,-

"Your supposition of the inland claims is right; the lands there being only claimed by a few of the principal Chiefs. This arises from our cultivations not having extended beyond the land you see cleared. The natives of each tribe claim a right to the lands they have had in cultivation; which cause so many claimants to the land on the sea coast. I will tell you our individual portions of land by name; as we want to have some patches for our own use to plant upon. I wish the Europeans to remove to seaward of the line I have now mentioned."

D. McLean, (addressing Poharama)-

"I can not agree with such proposals. Do not talk of removing any of the Europeans, as it does not show a friendly or kind feeling."

Poharama,-

"I will not press upon you, Mr. McLean, to have the Europeans removed; but I do not wish them to extend their cultivations. Our lands on the sea-side are not to be trespassed upon. Our pah at Huatoki is to

Page 3 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

be left in our possession; and Pukoauki, (at the flag-staff) is an old favourite Pah of our forefathers; and we wish to have it back again."

D. McLean,-

"I know the feelings you have for your old Pahs and burying-grounds. I will make your wishes known to the Governor, when he comes here."

Poharama,-

"Also the pa Honi Ropiha and his tribe occupy, with a frontage to the Waiwakaio river; to enable him and his natives to fish on this river; with the strip of land from the Pa to the sea. The portions cultivated there by Europeans still to remain in their possession."

D. McLean,-

"All your reasonable requests will be represented by me; and whatever lies in my power to further your present and future welfare and prosperity. My earnest wish is to be enabled to report favourably of your friendly and kind feelings amongst yourselves and towards the Europeans. I am very desirous that a mutual feeling will exist between you and the Europeans; in order that a settlement may be concluded in the land claims, and enable me to attend to the protection of yourselves and your children; and I hope to have your assistance towards the erection of a school-house, for the edification of you all,"

E Waka,-

"We have been

Page 4 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

to-day employed in staking out a line of demarcation between ourselves and the Europeans; inland of this line, including all the timber, is to be left for the natives. That is tabooed for us. The lands that the Europeans are cultivating is all that they are to have."

D. McLean, (addressing E Waka,)-

"I hope you remember your promises of friendship towards the Europeans, when you addressed the Governor at Ruatoki. I am afraid the Europeans will not remain, if they are not allowed more land than what they are now cultivating. I have often told you it would be much to your own interests to let the Europeans live among you in peace and quietness,- that it is almost annoying to make a repetition of the same."

E Waka,-

"We wish our Pas to revert to us, from your house where you now live, to the town; and a great part of the town belongs to absentees. This is all I have to say. I will write you the names of the lands I own, and send you a letter."

Eruera,-

"My words, and those of all the natives, are that we give no more land at present; till our claims are divided; when individuals may part with their several portions."

Page 5 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


D. McLean,-

"I am not here to beg of you to give up your lands. I ask you to do so, considering it to be for your own interest and benefit; and I trust, if the Governor wishes you to give land to the Europeans, you will comply with his request; and I am glad to find that you so fully rely upon his friendship and goodwill towards you. Be assured he will do you justice; and I hope you will learn to esteem the many acts of kindness he confers on you and all the natives. Neither will he discontinue those good acts; when he finds you are deserving of them.

"Can you now inform me as to the number of natives that are absent, of your tribe?"

Poharama,-

"About 400 men, women, and children."

Number of natives present,- 75.

Having supplied them with some food, as they wished for some,- we conversed about matters connected with their families, etc, etc.,- when they took their leave.

(Signed)
D. McLean.

English (ATL)


Land Question.

Meeting of the Ngamotu Natives with Mr. McLean, on Friday 27th. September 1844.

Poharama,-

"We have come to talk to you about our lands.

D. McLean,-

"I am always anxious to hear what you have to say about your lands; and prepared to hear any statements you have to make relative thereto."

Poharama,-

"From Mungootuku to Waiwakaio, we are willing to let the Europeans have, to extend inland to the line cut by the surveyors known as Holdsworthy's line. Let the sea side of this line be for the Europeans, and inland for the natives. I am willing to divide ourselves into distinct tribes, if you wish it; but our lands we cannot divide; as it is joint property. And we all consent that the portion we mention be given to the Europeans. If we divide our lands it will cause disputes among ourselves."

D. McLean,-

"The Governor wishes me to find out the distinct portions belonging to each individual or tribe; and as I suppose that the inland part of this surveyed block is only claimed by a few natives, perhaps you will point out your distinct claims inland."

Poharama,-

"Your supposition of the inland claims is right; the lands there being only claimed by a few of the principal Chiefs. This arises from our cultivations not having extended beyond the land you see cleared. The natives of each tribe claim a right to the lands they have had in cultivation; which cause so many claimants to the land on the sea coast. I will tell you our individual portions of land by name; as we want to have some patches for our own use to plant upon. I wish the Europeans to remove to seaward of the line I have now mentioned."

D. McLean, (addressing Poharama)-

"I can not agree with such proposals. Do not talk of removing any of the Europeans, as it does not show a friendly or kind feeling."

Poharama,-

"I will not press upon you, Mr. McLean, to have the Europeans removed; but I do not wish them to extend their cultivations. Our lands on the sea-side are not to be trespassed upon. Our pah at Huatoki is to be left in our possession; and Pukoauki, (at the flag-staff) is an old favourite Pah of our forefathers; and we wish to have it back again."

D. McLean,-

"I know the feelings you have for your old Pahs and burying-grounds. I will make your wishes known to the Governor, when he comes here."

Poharama,-

"Also the pa Honi Ropiha and his tribe occupy, with a frontage to the Waiwakaio river; to enable him and his natives to fish on this river; with the strip of land from the Pa to the sea. The portions cultivated there by Europeans still to remain in their possession."

D. McLean,-

"All your reasonable requests will be represented by me; and whatever lies in my power to further your present and future welfare and prosperity. My earnest wish is to be enabled to report favourably of your friendly and kind feelings amongst yourselves and towards the Europeans. I am very desirous that a mutual feeling will exist between you and the Europeans; in order that a settlement may be concluded in the land claims, and enable me to attend to the protection of yourselves and your children; and I hope to have your assistance towards the erection of a school-house, for the edification of you all,"

E Waka,-

"We have been to-day employed in staking out a line of demarcation between ourselves and the Europeans; inland of this line, including all the timber, is to be left for the natives. That is tabooed for us. The lands that the Europeans are cultivating is all that they are to have."

D. McLean, (addressing E Waka,)-

"I hope you remember your promises of friendship towards the Europeans, when you addressed the Governor at Ruatoki. I am afraid the Europeans will not remain, if they are not allowed more land than what they are now cultivating. I have often told you it would be much to your own interests to let the Europeans live among you in peace and quietness,- that it is almost annoying to make a repetition of the same."

E Waka,-

"We wish our Pas to revert to us, from your house where you now live, to the town; and a great part of the town belongs to absentees. This is all I have to say. I will write you the names of the lands I own, and send you a letter."

Eruera,-

"My words, and those of all the natives, are that we give no more land at present; till our claims are divided; when individuals may part with their several portions."

D. McLean,-

"I am not here to beg of you to give up your lands. I ask you to do so, considering it to be for your own interest and benefit; and I trust, if the Governor wishes you to give land to the Europeans, you will comply with his request; and I am glad to find that you so fully rely upon his friendship and goodwill towards you. Be assured he will do you justice; and I hope you will learn to esteem the many acts of kindness he confers on you and all the natives. Neither will he discontinue those good acts; when he finds you are deserving of them.

"Can you now inform me as to the number of natives that are absent, of your tribe?"

Poharama,-

"About 400 men, women, and children."

Number of natives present,- 75.

Having supplied them with some food, as they wished for some,- we conversed about matters connected with their families, etc, etc.,- when they took their leave.

(Signed)
D. McLean.

Part of:
Protector of Aborigines - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0001 (21 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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