Object #1000463 from MS-Papers-0032-0024

2 pages written 1 Dec 1868 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan in Clyde to Sir Donald McLean

From: Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Correspondence, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0024 (106 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Clyde

December 1st. 1868



Dear Sir,

I beg to acknowledge receipt of your letters of yesterday, I have written several times, but for reasons before stated, they have been delayed in transition. None of the messengers sent after the Force have returned, and we have no intimation whatever of the state of things at the Front, or of the present whereabouts of our people. I feel considerable anxiety about my friend, Mr. Burton, although he is more likely to travel in safety than anyone I know. It is scarcely necessary to comment further than I have already done, upon what appears to be, to me, a most extraodinary omission or oversight, - almost purposely done, as it could hardly by any possibility have oscaped notice, that means of communication was a necessity, The Force may be thrashed, cut off, or anything else under the sun, for aught we know of the matter. My repeated representations have not met with the slightest attention whatever. I am not clear that anything could be done to remedy the state of things, inasmuch as it might give rise to what occurred in Patea, with Mr. Parris and the Officers in Command. I do the best I can, under the existing conditions of things; the actual state of which Mr. Hamlin will more fully represent to you. I issued the half rations to the women, and I also wrote that the Government had agreed to do so, by

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English (ATL)

Mr. Burton; so that the natives might be informed, and made aware that they had no cause for anxiety on the part of their families.

I am glad that the Government have agreed to put a few men on pay; but as it left an open question for the consideration of the Commanding Officer, it is by no means unlikely that it may not be done.

My previous letters will have informed you of the condition of the natives left here, - such few as they are.

I need only add that I will do everything that lies in my power to keep you acquainted with current affairs.

I have thought it as well to send Mrs. Worgan and family down to Napier, as it will leave me more at liberty.


I beg to remain dear Sir, Your most obedient servant (Signed)
Geo. Worgan
To:- His Honor. D. McLean Esq.

English (ATL)


COPY.
Clyde

December 1st. 1868



Dear Sir,

I beg to acknowledge receipt of your letters of yesterday, I have written several times, but for reasons before stated, they have been delayed in transition. None of the messengers sent after the Force have returned, and we have no intimation whatever of the state of things at the Front, or of the present whereabouts of our people. I feel considerable anxiety about my friend, Mr. Burton, although he is more likely to travel in safety than anyone I know. It is scarcely necessary to comment further than I have already done, upon what appears to be, to me, a most extraodinary omission or oversight, - almost purposely done, as it could hardly by any possibility have oscaped notice, that means of communication was a necessity, The Force may be thrashed, cut off, or anything else under the sun, for aught we know of the matter. My repeated representations have not met with the slightest attention whatever. I am not clear that anything could be done to remedy the state of things, inasmuch as it might give rise to what occurred in Patea, with Mr. Parris and the Officers in Command. I do the best I can, under the existing conditions of things; the actual state of which Mr. Hamlin will more fully represent to you. I issued the half rations to the women, and I also wrote that the Government had agreed to do so, by Mr. Burton; so that the natives might be informed, and made aware that they had no cause for anxiety on the part of their families.

I am glad that the Government have agreed to put a few men on pay; but as it left an open question for the consideration of the Commanding Officer, it is by no means unlikely that it may not be done.

My previous letters will have informed you of the condition of the natives left here, - such few as they are.

I need only add that I will do everything that lies in my power to keep you acquainted with current affairs.

I have thought it as well to send Mrs. Worgan and family down to Napier, as it will leave me more at liberty.


I beg to remain dear Sir, Your most obedient servant (Signed)
Geo. Worgan
To:- His Honor. D. McLean Esq.

Part of:
Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Correspondence, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0024 (106 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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