Object #1000320 from MS-Papers-0032-0264

7 pages written 22 Dec 1870 by George Thomas Fannin in Napier City to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - G T Fannin, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0264 (53 digitised items). 51 letters written from Hawke's Bay, 1869-1870. Includes newspaper cuttings and drafts of three letters from McLean to Fannin, 15 Jan, 8 Apr & 12 Aug 1869

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Napier
22/12/70


Dear Sir,

I duly recd. your memo: Knowing you to be fully informed from Mr. Ormond on all matters of importance that transpire and more particularly knowing that your time must be more than fully occupied I have refrained from troubling you with my usual scraps of news - besides the Hawkes B. Herald, Do you get it? if not let me know and I will send it - contains very fully all that transpires. The particular and most engrossing topic of the day in Napier is the R. M. Court - or rather that gentleman himself. I must say this for him that he is the most painstaken R. M. or J. P. that I have ever seen.

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English (ATL)

The pertinacity with which he sticks to a subject if it were not so tedious and in every ones opinion so unneccessary - would be to the highest degree most praiseworthy. The last 2 Heralds which I send you contains about as far as I can recollection 6 columns of matter - portion I believe of his own writing - I have been at Poverty Bay since I last wrote - the first time I have been out of the Province since I entered it some 17 years ago. Capt. Fairchild made me so comfortable - and was so attentive to all and every one - Mr. Locke seems to perform his work satisfactorily if one can judge from the amt. of correspondence he gets thro'. Major Green has always lots to do he is engaged at present cutting out a paper ornament for

Page 3 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

the Church on Xmas day. Mrs. Green assisting him. Inspector Scully is well but fretted for the death of one of the twins his favoured one. You remember Cashmore of the Big Bush saw mill he has just retd. from England. He was away 5 months and 9 days - spent 24 days at home - so much for the San Fransico line of travelling - by the bye that was a master stroke of your Govt. and mentioning Govt. brings my mind back to 12 months or so ago what a different position the Colony is in now - no daily reports of massacres and murders and surprises. You cannot help feeling but happy and contented

Page 4 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

that you are the means of bringing about such a state of affairs. I am afraid about Todds question. Hamlin tells me they are a bad lot that is the tribe I mean. E. Hamlin does not particularly like tackling the Arawas at Maketu - he thinks they are a wild cunning lot. You will be sorry to hear Capt. Carter is very poorly or at least he has got into that state of mind hypochondiacal I should call it that no one can do anything with him - he sits on the sofa with his feet doubled under him and a rug about his legs on the hotest day you can imagine. He went out to drive a couple of weeks ago. I must tell you the day was so hot that even in my cool office

Page 5 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

I had to have my coat off - he was muffled up in his big coat first then a heavier one and then an oilskin (sun shining) then a muffler and lastly an umbrella and a rug about his legs - he was taking his daughter to a picnic as soon as he got to the Toll gate he said "well I am afraid as it is so hot that I shall never be able to have strength to get homeunless we go back at once - A window or Door must not be left open for a minute - when he walks out it is only for 5 minutes. Many other peculiarities I might mention but I have said sufficient to show you the state of his mind.

Page 6 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Otherwise he is perfectly right - he forgets nothing - his inordinate appetite I imagine has a great deal to do with it - Dr. Hitchings and Spencer both say he wont get better. Mr. Ormond left yesterday for Wallingford - he told Green and myself to divide the 9 or 10 days he will be away between us as holidays. There is one thing I wish you would do for me. I have been recommended for a commission as Ensign - what I want a commission for is that I may be placed upon the "permanent unattached list" if the word permenent is not inserted in the notice I should be liable to serve again in 5 years time. You might if possible make it Lieutenant-Ensign unattached is so insignificant. The same Gazette that contains the notification of the Commission might also contain my being put on the unattached list. Please excuse my troubling you so much. Mr. Williamson who has just retd. from a trip inland told me yesterday that Maraekakaho looks beautiful. He had never been that road before He says the country generally

Page 7 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

looks well. Hoping you are well and Please God as successfull as ever and wishing you a pleasant Christmas and a happy new Year,


I am, Dear Mr. McLean, Your obt. Serv.
Geo. Thos. Fannin

English (ATL)

Napier
22/12/70


Dear Sir,

I duly recd. your memo: Knowing you to be fully informed from Mr. Ormond on all matters of importance that transpire and more particularly knowing that your time must be more than fully occupied I have refrained from troubling you with my usual scraps of news - besides the Hawkes B. Herald, Do you get it? if not let me know and I will send it - contains very fully all that transpires. The particular and most engrossing topic of the day in Napier is the R. M. Court - or rather that gentleman himself. I must say this for him that he is the most painstaken R. M. or J. P. that I have ever seen. The pertinacity with which he sticks to a subject if it were not so tedious and in every ones opinion so unneccessary - would be to the highest degree most praiseworthy. The last 2 Heralds which I send you contains about as far as I can recollection 6 columns of matter - portion I believe of his own writing - I have been at Poverty Bay since I last wrote - the first time I have been out of the Province since I entered it some 17 years ago. Capt. Fairchild made me so comfortable - and was so attentive to all and every one - Mr. Locke seems to perform his work satisfactorily if one can judge from the amt. of correspondence he gets thro'. Major Green has always lots to do he is engaged at present cutting out a paper ornament for the Church on Xmas day. Mrs. Green assisting him. Inspector Scully is well but fretted for the death of one of the twins his favoured one. You remember Cashmore of the Big Bush saw mill he has just retd. from England. He was away 5 months and 9 days - spent 24 days at home - so much for the San Fransico line of travelling - by the bye that was a master stroke of your Govt. and mentioning Govt. brings my mind back to 12 months or so ago what a different position the Colony is in now - no daily reports of massacres and murders and surprises. You cannot help feeling but happy and contented that you are the means of bringing about such a state of affairs. I am afraid about Todds question. Hamlin tells me they are a bad lot that is the tribe I mean. E. Hamlin does not particularly like tackling the Arawas at Maketu - he thinks they are a wild cunning lot. You will be sorry to hear Capt. Carter is very poorly or at least he has got into that state of mind hypochondiacal I should call it that no one can do anything with him - he sits on the sofa with his feet doubled under him and a rug about his legs on the hotest day you can imagine. He went out to drive a couple of weeks ago. I must tell you the day was so hot that even in my cool office I had to have my coat off - he was muffled up in his big coat first then a heavier one and then an oilskin (sun shining) then a muffler and lastly an umbrella and a rug about his legs - he was taking his daughter to a picnic as soon as he got to the Toll gate he said "well I am afraid as it is so hot that I shall never be able to have strength to get homeunless we go back at once - A window or Door must not be left open for a minute - when he walks out it is only for 5 minutes. Many other peculiarities I might mention but I have said sufficient to show you the state of his mind. Otherwise he is perfectly right - he forgets nothing - his inordinate appetite I imagine has a great deal to do with it - Dr. Hitchings and Spencer both say he wont get better. Mr. Ormond left yesterday for Wallingford - he told Green and myself to divide the 9 or 10 days he will be away between us as holidays. There is one thing I wish you would do for me. I have been recommended for a commission as Ensign - what I want a commission for is that I may be placed upon the "permanent unattached list" if the word permenent is not inserted in the notice I should be liable to serve again in 5 years time. You might if possible make it Lieutenant-Ensign unattached is so insignificant. The same Gazette that contains the notification of the Commission might also contain my being put on the unattached list. Please excuse my troubling you so much. Mr. Williamson who has just retd. from a trip inland told me yesterday that Maraekakaho looks beautiful. He had never been that road before He says the country generally looks well. Hoping you are well and Please God as successfull as ever and wishing you a pleasant Christmas and a happy new Year,


I am, Dear Mr. McLean, Your obt. Serv.
Geo. Thos. Fannin

Part of:
Inward letters - G T Fannin, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0264 (53 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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