Object #1000180 from MS-Papers-0032-0265

9 pages written 21 Jun 1872 by George Thomas Fannin in Napier City to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - G T Fannin, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0265 (53 digitised items). 51 letters, memos and fragments written from Hawke's Bay, 1871-1876, and undated. Includes newspaper clippings.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Napier

June 21st. 1872.



Dear Sir,

I expect you will take a very careless glance at this letter - knowing that you are kept well posted up in all local matters that transpire in Hawke's Bay. Feeling this, I expect to be pitched into your waste-paper basket. However, having the first few moments at my disposal, for several weeks, I give myself the pleasure of attempting to engross your attention for a few minutes.

I sent you in my last a very hasty scribble for which I beg pardon. I expect you could hardly read it. I was suffering from a fearful headache, which is always the result of

Page 2 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

an evening spent in a crowded meeting, and mail closing at 9 o'clock a.m.

The Meeting was very numerously attended perhaps over 400 present. Very orderly when no one attempted to speak in favour of Mr. H.R. Russell; but any hint in that way was met with a storm of hisses.

Te Nenau Karaitine spoke well. You may remember I cautioned you twice about Carson. I do so most emphatically again, no matter what he says and does for you. He and Major are both your bitter enemies. The evening of the Meeting, Major Carson happened to be next me, at my very elbow. When people would not listen to Gussy, he, the Major, got as mad as possible, stamped and yelled; and when Capt. Curling replied to Gussy, and was listened to at

Page 3 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

the Meeting, he grew frantic, and made a perfect blackguard of himself, in trying to put him down. Gussy was pitching into the Heretaunga purchase and discussing Russell. But you knew that before, besides hinting which that it was reported there were very questionable arrangements in Native matters-of a person high in power (evidently referring to yourself.)

I send you a couple of extracts from the "Telegraph", speaking very favourably in support of the action taken, and the agregarious folly of Mr. Russell, and I might say, of the Government, in allowing such a state of affairs to continue. Action is expected from you in this matter, no matter how difficult it may be for you to act, however much against your will, you

Page 4 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

must sink personal reticence, and speaking figureatively, take the bull by the horns.

I know you will excuse my speaking my mind. Request the favour to dismiss him from the Upper House; cancel his appointment of J.P. Why should such a sneaking disturber of the public peace hold such high positions; to the disgrace and contempt of all sensible people. You would have the support (unanimous) of the whole Colony. It rests with you as Native and Defence Minister, and you only, to take this action.

We had a very very quiet Council - 10 days. It might be summed up as follows:- Estimate of Revenue passed without a question. Expenditure, - very little

Page 5 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

debating, unless it was when Mr. Ormond acquiesed in the Toll Gate expenditure being expended on Redeliffe line of Road to Puketapu, in addition to the same on Hill to Puketapu. Then Mr. Tiffen fired up, and pitched into expenditure on road south of Waipukurau, and erection of Wallingford bridge, and anything at all which he thought might effect Mr. Ormond. At the end of it, he went and spoke soft nothings to Mr. Ormond, which I expect were fully appreciated, so it was however only for the evening.

Mr. Colense and Mr. Kenny had a tiff. I have mailed it to the papers; Sutton also and Colenso; and Buchanan and Colenso. Mr. Buchanan hates Mr. Colenso, for what, I

Page 6 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

cannot make out. The meeting to oppose Mr. Colenso at his re-election for the Town because of Mr. Colenso's acceptance of the appointment of Inspector of schools, granted to-day. Of course you knew Mr. B. tried for Superintendent, expecting Mr. Ormond intended to resign. Mr. Tiffen was also in the market, Mr. AlDeane, Mr. Rhodes, and some say Col. Lambert. So Mr. Ormond did the wisest thing, and which certainly everyone in Hawke's Bay wished - except those above mentioned - and retained his office.

But to return to the programme of the Council - Mr. Rotledge got a Bill passed to erect a bridge across the harbour mouth; Mr. Tiffen, a Bill to erect a toll gate on a road, from Old Munn's

Page 7 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

point to Tutaekuri, and so across to Purimu, and thence to Parke Island, somewhere to Whareangi, and from thence to Taupo.

An Amended Shop Act, was, as usual, brought in, and as usual was ordered to be read this day 6 months. Turton's decision being pending, entirely engrossed Tanner's attention, so we had very little of him this time. Col. Lambert had all the returns laid on the table for him, before he asked for them, and had no Harbour Improvement to pitch into, so he was done for.

Buchanan was speaker, and hopes for better times; so so with him. Mr. Rhodes does not at all like not being Superintendent, but I suppose must yield. I think that concludes

Page 8 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

the programme. I forgot Dolbel and his Waitaha bridge. I used often smile to myself, when you got up year after year to reply to his question why the money voted for this purpose had not been expended.

I have ascertained that the "Herald" is sent to you regularly; if you have time to glance over the leaves, it gives you all only the things that to my mind do not matter.

We are having a beautiful Winter. Feed up to your knees everywhere. No cold weather to talk of yet. You never told me if the old account of Native affairs was ever cleared up. I hope that weight is off your mind.

Page 9 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


Mr. Marshall, the school-master, held his last school examination yesterday. I somehow think the children, if not the people, will miss him. He was certainly the very quintessence of a child's monitor and friend. Poor old fellow, he is going Home. Another old Colonist leaving! Capt. Carter, too, gone. I am beginning to feel as the last of the old stock. I am the only original Officer left. The first appointed under the Provincial Government here, and the last. I will now conclude, as I am getting glum.


Good-bye my dear Mr. McLean Every success! I am dear Sir, Yours most faithfully (Signed)
Geo. Thos. Fannin

English (ATL)

Napier

June 21st. 1872.



Dear Sir,

I expect you will take a very careless glance at this letter - knowing that you are kept well posted up in all local matters that transpire in Hawke's Bay. Feeling this, I expect to be pitched into your waste-paper basket. However, having the first few moments at my disposal, for several weeks, I give myself the pleasure of attempting to engross your attention for a few minutes.

I sent you in my last a very hasty scribble for which I beg pardon. I expect you could hardly read it. I was suffering from a fearful headache, which is always the result of an evening spent in a crowded meeting, and mail closing at 9 o'clock a.m.

The Meeting was very numerously attended perhaps over 400 present. Very orderly when no one attempted to speak in favour of Mr. H.R. Russell; but any hint in that way was met with a storm of hisses.

Te Nenau Karaitine spoke well. You may remember I cautioned you twice about Carson. I do so most emphatically again, no matter what he says and does for you. He and Major are both your bitter enemies. The evening of the Meeting, Major Carson happened to be next me, at my very elbow. When people would not listen to Gussy, he, the Major, got as mad as possible, stamped and yelled; and when Capt. Curling replied to Gussy, and was listened to at the Meeting, he grew frantic, and made a perfect blackguard of himself, in trying to put him down. Gussy was pitching into the Heretaunga purchase and discussing Russell. But you knew that before, besides hinting which that it was reported there were very questionable arrangements in Native matters-of a person high in power (evidently referring to yourself.)

I send you a couple of extracts from the "Telegraph", speaking very favourably in support of the action taken, and the agregarious folly of Mr. Russell, and I might say, of the Government, in allowing such a state of affairs to continue. Action is expected from you in this matter, no matter how difficult it may be for you to act, however much against your will, you must sink personal reticence, and speaking figureatively, take the bull by the horns.

I know you will excuse my speaking my mind. Request the favour to dismiss him from the Upper House; cancel his appointment of J.P. Why should such a sneaking disturber of the public peace hold such high positions; to the disgrace and contempt of all sensible people. You would have the support (unanimous) of the whole Colony. It rests with you as Native and Defence Minister, and you only, to take this action.

We had a very very quiet Council - 10 days. It might be summed up as follows:- Estimate of Revenue passed without a question. Expenditure, - very little debating, unless it was when Mr. Ormond acquiesed in the Toll Gate expenditure being expended on Redeliffe line of Road to Puketapu, in addition to the same on Hill to Puketapu. Then Mr. Tiffen fired up, and pitched into expenditure on road south of Waipukurau, and erection of Wallingford bridge, and anything at all which he thought might effect Mr. Ormond. At the end of it, he went and spoke soft nothings to Mr. Ormond, which I expect were fully appreciated, so it was however only for the evening.

Mr. Colense and Mr. Kenny had a tiff. I have mailed it to the papers; Sutton also and Colenso; and Buchanan and Colenso. Mr. Buchanan hates Mr. Colenso, for what, I cannot make out. The meeting to oppose Mr. Colenso at his re-election for the Town because of Mr. Colenso's acceptance of the appointment of Inspector of schools, granted to-day. Of course you knew Mr. B. tried for Superintendent, expecting Mr. Ormond intended to resign. Mr. Tiffen was also in the market, Mr. AlDeane, Mr. Rhodes, and some say Col. Lambert. So Mr. Ormond did the wisest thing, and which certainly everyone in Hawke's Bay wished - except those above mentioned - and retained his office.

But to return to the programme of the Council - Mr. Rotledge got a Bill passed to erect a bridge across the harbour mouth; Mr. Tiffen, a Bill to erect a toll gate on a road, from Old Munn's point to Tutaekuri, and so across to Purimu, and thence to Parke Island, somewhere to Whareangi, and from thence to Taupo.

An Amended Shop Act, was, as usual, brought in, and as usual was ordered to be read this day 6 months. Turton's decision being pending, entirely engrossed Tanner's attention, so we had very little of him this time. Col. Lambert had all the returns laid on the table for him, before he asked for them, and had no Harbour Improvement to pitch into, so he was done for.

Buchanan was speaker, and hopes for better times; so so with him. Mr. Rhodes does not at all like not being Superintendent, but I suppose must yield. I think that concludes the programme. I forgot Dolbel and his Waitaha bridge. I used often smile to myself, when you got up year after year to reply to his question why the money voted for this purpose had not been expended.

I have ascertained that the "Herald" is sent to you regularly; if you have time to glance over the leaves, it gives you all only the things that to my mind do not matter.

We are having a beautiful Winter. Feed up to your knees everywhere. No cold weather to talk of yet. You never told me if the old account of Native affairs was ever cleared up. I hope that weight is off your mind.

Mr. Marshall, the school-master, held his last school examination yesterday. I somehow think the children, if not the people, will miss him. He was certainly the very quintessence of a child's monitor and friend. Poor old fellow, he is going Home. Another old Colonist leaving! Capt. Carter, too, gone. I am beginning to feel as the last of the old stock. I am the only original Officer left. The first appointed under the Provincial Government here, and the last. I will now conclude, as I am getting glum.


Good-bye my dear Mr. McLean Every success! I am dear Sir, Yours most faithfully (Signed)
Geo. Thos. Fannin

Part of:
Inward letters - G T Fannin, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0265 (53 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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