Object #1000122 from MS-Papers-0032-0276

3 pages written 24 Mar 1858 by Josiah Flight in Te Henui to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items). 43 letters addressed from Mangoraka, Te Ika Moana, Resident Magistrate's Office, New Plymouth, Henui, 1846-1872, and undated. Also letter from A D Flight, 6 Mar [187-], New Plymouth to Sir Donald McLean; letter from Josiah Flight to Thomas Kelly, 22 Jul 1870 re Cape Egmont Flax CompanyAlso poem addressed to `My dear Donald McLean' entitled `No Land' (on verso) written by Josiah Flight

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Henui

24th March 1858



My dear McLean,

I herewith send you a copy of a letter I have written to Mr. Richmond. You will from that gather my opinions of the present crisis in Maori affairs; one which if rightly improved as it appears to me will open up a happy future for the inhabitants of this country not as Europeans and Maoris, but as subjects alike of one sovereign, submitting to and receiving the protection of one code of laws. The difficulties that may present themselves in the endeavour to accomplish this much wished for end have only to be boldly met to be overcome; and if our government will take the initiative every real friend to this country be he Englishman or be he Maori must feel it his duty to come forward to assist in its accomplishment.

To this part of New Zealand all eyes seem now directed and the conduct of the Government here will influence for weal or for woe the

Page 2 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

movements of the Natives in all other parts of the country --- It would be a sad mistake indeed of the Colonists being at a distance from New Plymouth to suppose that any outbreak here would be confined in its consequences to this place. The fire once kindled would so rage that Auckland and Wellington could not escape its ravages; and I believe the Middle Island would most likely receive a scorching ere it became extinguished --- On the other hand pacify the Natives by righteous protection and a peace so established would spread its beneficial affects to every portion of the Colony ---

I feel very anxious that you should get your letters early that go by this mail, and I have therefore written to Mr. Woon to request him to forward them to you with all despatch.

I believe your presence here at this time will be of incalculable service and could you so arrange matters as to postpone your business in the South until after your visit to this place would advise your proceeding here with all despatch.

The purchase of land has long been looked on me as a means to the end I have before referred to and that end now appears to me may be worked out by a more expeditious road than the negotiating land sales --- Could we establish our laws, the settling of the land question would speedily follow --- Every day brings fresh proof of the desire of the Natives for the establishment of a strong, firm Government over them; and I trust the time is not distant when we shall see such an one established.

I should have written you before but knew not where to direct and did not think it worth while to send you letters which might have to make the circuit of the island and then perhaps find you at the dwelling place of the writer ---

The present quarrel of the natives seems to far to present a new feature inasmuch as though lives were lost enough to be considered by Maori usage sufficient utu, as

Page 3 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

well as property to a large amount destroyed yet the more numerous party follow up their success with a determined intention of wholesale slaughter that so far as I am informed is unprecedented --- But on this matter as well as some others Mr. Whiteley will most probably have informed you as he said he should write to you by this post.

The last account by Mr. Whiteley yesterday of Ihaia was that he had food, firewood, and water enough to enable him to hold out some time longer --- He seems to be more in want of powder and lead than anything else this last of course I have not from Mr. W. W. King has shewn himself to be a cowardly, bloodthirsty miscreant, and with the upstart Tamati ti Ito the sorcerer is the principal in their wicked movements.

I can only repeat "Come if you can", and as soon as you can, as I believe you might do much good --- You may suppose what I have to do to keep down some of the fiery spirits of New Plymouth --- Mrs. F. and the children desire to be kindly remembered to you.

Believe me, dear Sir
Yrs. very fthfly,
Josiah Flight
D. McLean Esqr.

English (ATL)

Henui

24th March 1858



My dear McLean,

I herewith send you a copy of a letter I have written to Mr. Richmond. You will from that gather my opinions of the present crisis in Maori affairs; one which if rightly improved as it appears to me will open up a happy future for the inhabitants of this country not as Europeans and Maoris, but as subjects alike of one sovereign, submitting to and receiving the protection of one code of laws. The difficulties that may present themselves in the endeavour to accomplish this much wished for end have only to be boldly met to be overcome; and if our government will take the initiative every real friend to this country be he Englishman or be he Maori must feel it his duty to come forward to assist in its accomplishment.

To this part of New Zealand all eyes seem now directed and the conduct of the Government here will influence for weal or for woe the movements of the Natives in all other parts of the country --- It would be a sad mistake indeed of the Colonists being at a distance from New Plymouth to suppose that any outbreak here would be confined in its consequences to this place. The fire once kindled would so rage that Auckland and Wellington could not escape its ravages; and I believe the Middle Island would most likely receive a scorching ere it became extinguished --- On the other hand pacify the Natives by righteous protection and a peace so established would spread its beneficial affects to every portion of the Colony ---

I feel very anxious that you should get your letters early that go by this mail, and I have therefore written to Mr. Woon to request him to forward them to you with all despatch.

I believe your presence here at this time will be of incalculable service and could you so arrange matters as to postpone your business in the South until after your visit to this place would advise your proceeding here with all despatch.

The purchase of land has long been looked on me as a means to the end I have before referred to and that end now appears to me may be worked out by a more expeditious road than the negotiating land sales --- Could we establish our laws, the settling of the land question would speedily follow --- Every day brings fresh proof of the desire of the Natives for the establishment of a strong, firm Government over them; and I trust the time is not distant when we shall see such an one established.

I should have written you before but knew not where to direct and did not think it worth while to send you letters which might have to make the circuit of the island and then perhaps find you at the dwelling place of the writer ---

The present quarrel of the natives seems to far to present a new feature inasmuch as though lives were lost enough to be considered by Maori usage sufficient utu, as well as property to a large amount destroyed yet the more numerous party follow up their success with a determined intention of wholesale slaughter that so far as I am informed is unprecedented --- But on this matter as well as some others Mr. Whiteley will most probably have informed you as he said he should write to you by this post.

The last account by Mr. Whiteley yesterday of Ihaia was that he had food, firewood, and water enough to enable him to hold out some time longer --- He seems to be more in want of powder and lead than anything else this last of course I have not from Mr. W. W. King has shewn himself to be a cowardly, bloodthirsty miscreant, and with the upstart Tamati ti Ito the sorcerer is the principal in their wicked movements.

I can only repeat "Come if you can", and as soon as you can, as I believe you might do much good --- You may suppose what I have to do to keep down some of the fiery spirits of New Plymouth --- Mrs. F. and the children desire to be kindly remembered to you.

Believe me, dear Sir
Yrs. very fthfly,
Josiah Flight
D. McLean Esqr.

Part of:
Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1000122). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments